OHS Code Explanation Guide

Published Date: July 01, 2009
Bookmark this page

Part 23 Scaffolds and Temporary Work Platforms

Section 347 Standards

Subsection 347(1)

CSA Standard

CSA Standard B354.4-02 applies to all integral frame, boom-supported elevating work platforms used to position personnel, along with their tools and necessary materials, at overhead work locations. The boom may telescope, articulate, or rotate, and extend the platform beyond the base dimensions. The platform is power operated with primary functions controlled from the platform. The equipment may be manually or self-propelled. Figure 23.26 shows examples of typical boom-type elevating work platforms.

Figure 23.26 Articulated boom and aerial device

An articulated boom is a boom made of two or more hinged sections that support the work platform. A telescoping boom is one in which motion created between two or more boom sections is in a longitudinal direction that lengthens or shortens the boom.

Clause 8.1 of the CSA Standard requires the platform to be equipped with a guardrail or other equivalent structure. Chain, or its equivalent, may be substituted as the toprail or midrail across an access opening. Clause 8.3 of the Standard requires fall protection anchorage point(s) to be installed on the work platform.

The Standard does not require the platform to be marked as complying with the Standard. However, a permanent plate must be located on the platform that lists:

(a) the make, model, serial number and the manufacturer’s name and address;
(b) the rated working load;
(c) the maximum platform height;
(d) the maximum horizontal reach;
(e) special warnings, cautions, or restrictions necessary for safe operation, including the use of outriders or stabilizers; and
(f) the operating instructions and a notice indicating the need to read the operating manual before use.

The product manufacturer can provide confirmation of compliance with the Standard.

ANSI Standard

ANSI Standard A92.5-2006, Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms, applies to self-propelled integral chassis aerial platforms having a platform that can be positioned completely beyond the base and used to position workers, along with their necessary tools and materials, at work locations. Aerial platforms are power operated with primary functions, including drive, controlled from the platform. Such aerial platforms are intended to be occupied when driven. Figure 23.26 shows examples of typical boom-supported elevating work platforms.

The Standard sets criteria for the design, manufacture, performance, inspection, training, maintenance, testing and operation of the platforms. Clause 4.12.5 of the Standard requires boom-supported elevating work platforms to be equipped with anchorage(s) for personal fall protection for fall protection devices for workers occupying the platform. Clause 4.12.2 requires such platforms to have a guardrail system. Flexible materials such as cables, chains or ropes cannot be used in the guardrail system.

A boom-supported elevating work platform complying with the ANSI Standard will have a manufacturer-installed nameplate indicating that the equipment complies with the Standard.

Subsection 347(3)

CSA Standard

CSA Standard CAN/CSA-B354.2.-01, Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms, applies to self-propelled integral chassis elevated work platforms that have a platform that cannot be positioned completely beyond the base and that are used to position personnel, along with their necessary tools and materials, at work locations. Self-propelled elevating work platforms (aerial platforms) are power operated with primary functions, including drive, controlled from the platform. The Standard applies to aerial platforms designed for use in both on-slab and off-slab applications.

An on-slab surface means any asphalt, concrete, or equivalent surface. An off-slab surface is an uneven surface made of materials other than asphalt, concrete, or their equivalent. Compacted soil is an example of an off-slab surface. Work platforms intended for off-slab work are more stable than those intended for use on paved/slab surfaces.

The Standard specifies the minimum requirements for the establishment of criteria for the design, manufacture, remanufacture, rebuild/recondition, testing, performance, inspection, training, maintenance, and safe operation of self-propelled elevating work platforms.

Self-propelled elevating work platforms are generally intended for use over level surfaces. Normally they are not insulated for use near electrically energized circuits nor are they intended to be used in hazardous locations. The term self-propelled means that the machine can be power driven using a primary set of operator controls located on the elevated work platform. Figure 23.27 shows examples of typical self-propelled elevating work platforms.

Figure 23.27 Examples of powered (self-propelled) elevating platforms

Clause 4.13.2 of the Standard requires the platform to be equipped with a guardrail. Clause 4.13.5 requires fall protection anchorage point(s) to be installed on the work platform. The platform must be equipped with one anchorage point for each occupant.

The Standard does not require the platform to be marked as complying with the Standard. However, the platform must be durably marked with various warnings and instructions. The following is a partial list of what is required by clause 4.19.1 of the Standard:

(a) the make, model, serial number and the manufacturer’s name and address;
(b) the rated working load;
(c) the maximum platform height;
(d) special warnings, cautions, or restrictions necessary for safe operation, including the use of outriders or stabilizers; and
(e) the operating instructions and a notice indicating the need to read the operating manual before use.

The product manufacturer can provide confirmation of compliance with the Standard.

ANSI Standard

ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.6-2006, Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms, applies to self-propelled integral chassis aerial platforms having a platform that cannot be positioned completely beyond the base and that are used to position personnel, along with their tools and materials, at work locations. Aerial platforms are power operated with primary functions, including drive, controlled from the platform. Figure 23.27 shows examples of the equipment covered by the Standard.

The Standard sets criteria for the design, manufacture, remanufacture, rebuild/recondition, testing, performance, inspection, training, maintenance and operation of the platforms.

The ANSI Standard allows manufacturers to voluntarily include fall protection anchorages on their equipment. When provided, Clause 4.13.5 of the Standard requires the anchorage(s) for personal fall protection to be capable of withstanding a load of 16 kilonewtons (3,600 pounds-force). Special requirements apply if more than one worker uses a single anchorage at one time.

Clause 4.12.2 requires all work platforms to be equipped with a guardrail system. Flexible materials such as cables, chains and ropes cannot be used in the guardrail system except as a midrail at access openings 760 millimetres (30 inches) wide, or less.

A self-propelled elevating work platform complying with the ANSI Standard will have a manufactured-installed nameplate indicating that the equipment complies with the Standard.

Subsection 347(4)

CSA Standard

CSA Standard CAN3-B354.1-M82 (R2004), Elevating Rolling Work Platforms, applies to elevating rolling work platforms used on a level surface and that are incapable of being self-propelled from an operating station on the work platform. The work platforms are used to position workers, along with their tools and necessary materials, at overhead work locations. The Standard describes requirements and recommended practices for product design and manufacture, lists performance criteria, and sets standards for testing and inspection. Figure 23.28 shows the type of equipment to which this Standard applies.

Figure 23.28 Examples of manual elevating platforms

The Standard does not require the platform to be marked as complying with the Standard. However, a permanent plate must be located on the platform that lists:

(a) the make, model, serial number and the manufacturer’s name and address;
(b) the rated working load;
(c) the maximum platform height;
(d) the maximum horizontal reach;
(e) special warnings, cautions, or restrictions necessary for safe operation, including the use of outriders or stabilizers; and
(f) the operating instructions and a notice indicating the need to read the operating manual before use.

The product manufacturer can provide confirmation of compliance with the Standard.

ANSI Standard

ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.3-2006, Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms, applies to manually propelled, integral chassis aerial platforms having a platform that cannot be positioned completely beyond the base and that are used to position workers, together with their tools and materials, at work locations. Platforms are adjusted by manual or powered means and cannot be occupied when moved horizontally. This Standard sets criteria for the design, manufacture, testing, performance, inspection, training, maintenance and operation of the platforms. Figure 23.28 shows typical examples of the equipment to which the Standard applies.

Clause 4.9.5 of the Standard requires the aerial platform to be equipped with a fall protection anchor point(s) if the platform’s guardrail system, or parts of the guardrail system, can be removed. Clause 4.9.2 requires all work platforms to be equipped with a guardrail system. Flexible materials such as cables, chains and ropes cannot be used in the guardrail system.

A manually propelled elevating aerial platform complying with the ANSI Standard will have a manufacturer-installed nameplate indicating that the equipment complies with the Standard.

Subsection 347(5)

CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225-00 (R2005), Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices, sets criteria for the design, manufacture, testing, inspection, installation, maintenance, use and operation of vehicle-mounted aerial devices. These devices are installed on a chassis, are primarily used to position workers for work purposes, and are used for operator training. The vehicle may be a truck, trailer or all-terrain vehicle. The design and manufacturing requirements of the Standard apply to those devices manufactured after the date of publication of the Standard. Figure 23.29 shows a typical aerial device.

Figure 23.29 Examples of a typical aerial device

The Standard recognizes both insulated and non-insulated aerial devices. Insulated aerial devices are classified into three categories based on the degree of electrical protection they provide and the type of work being performed.

Clause 4.9.4 of the Standard requires the work platform to be equipped with a fall arrest anchor(s) capable of withstanding a load of 22.2 kilonewtons (5000 pounds-force). Clause 4.5.4 of the previous 1988 edition of the Standard required anchors to have a strength of 18 kilonewtons (4000 pounds-force). Special requirements apply if more than one worker uses a single anchor at one time. Clause 8 of the Standard, “Responsibilities of Owners”, describes what is required of equipment owners in terms of equipment inspections and tests.

Although an attached nameplate may show compliance information, an aerial device is not required by the Standard to bear a marking indicating compliance with the requirements of the Standard. Where compliance is in question, the manufacturer’s specifications should be consulted.

Subsection 347(6)

ANSI Standard

ANSI Standard ANS/SIA A92.9-1993, Mast-Climbing Work Platforms, applies to mast-climbing platforms primarily used to position workers, including their tools and materials, so that work can be performed. Platforms can be adjusted by manual or powered means. The Standard sets criteria for the design, manufacture, performance, inspection, training, maintenance, testing and operation of these work platforms. Figure 23.30 shows examples of typical platforms covered by the Standard.

A mast-climbing work platform complying with this Standard will have a manufacturer-installed nameplate indicating that the equipment complies with the Standard.

Figure 23.30 Examples of typical mast-climbing work platforms

Subsection 347(7)

ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.8-1993 (R1998), Vehicle-Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices, applies to mobile units generally designed to be supported on bridge surfaces of varying degrees of grade and super-elevation and have the capability of providing personnel quick and easy access to the underside of such structures. The Standard describes requirements for the design, manufacture, testing, inspection, installation, maintenance, use, training and operation of such devices.

Figure 23.31 shows typical examples of vehicle-mounted bridge inspection and maintenance devices. The device manufacturer can provide confirmation of compliance with the Standard.

Figure 23.31 Typical examples of vehicle-mounted bridge inspection and maintenance devices

Subsection 347(8)

ASME Standard B56.1-2000, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks, defines safety requirements relating to the elements of design, operation and maintenance of low lift and high lift powered industrial trucks controlled by a riding or walking operator, and intended for use on compacted, improved surfaces.

An order picker lift truck complying with the Standard will have a manufacturer-installed nameplate indicating that the lift truck complies with those mandatory requirements of the Standard applicable to the manufacturer. The lift truck may also bear other markings, authorized by an appropriate nationally recognized testing laboratory, indicating compliance with the Standard.

This subsection applies to both high lift and low lift order pickers. The ASME Standard defines this equipment as follows:

“high lift order picker truck” means a high lift truck controllable by the operator stationed on a platform movable with the load-engaging means and intended for (manual) stock selection. The truck may be capable of self-loading and/or tiering. Figure 23.32 shows an example of such a truck.

Figure 23.32 High lift order picker rider truck

“low lift order picker truck” means a low lift truck controllable by an operator when stationed on, or walking adjacent to, the truck, and intended for (manual) stock selection. The truck may be capable of self-loading. Figure 23.33 shows an example of such a truck.

Figure 23.33 Low lift order picker truck