Employer records | How to use the database

Employer records | How to use the database

Usage terms, calculation formulas and field definitions for the employer claims and occupational fatality records database.

Overview

The records in this database were collected from over 210,000 employers insured by Alberta’s Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB). These records cover 5 years of employer-specific data on lost-time claims and disabling injury claims and fatalities, reported to the WCB by March 31, 2015.

Industry and safety associations, labour organizations, employers and workers can incorporate this information into their plans to enhance workplace health and safety. Please review the Terms of use below and the Disclaimer, for the proper use of this information.

Records in this database include:

  • number of lost-time claims by employer and industry, and provincial totals
  • person-years estimate by employer and industry, and provincial totals
  • lost-time claim rate by employer and industry, and provincial totals
  • disabling injury rate by employer and industry, and provincial totals
  • number of fatalities by employer and industry, and provincial totals, including fatalities resulting from work-related motor vehicle and workplace incidents, and occupational disease
  • if employer holds a Certificate of Recognition (COR)
     

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More about the database

Show Answer The content

WCB collects the most comprehensive data on workplace injuries and fatalities in Alberta. This information is reported by employers who are required to have WCB accounts. It allows for the tracking of workplace health and safety performance indicators over time.

Alberta Labour calculates and provides the lost-time and disabling injury claim rates based on the formulas below.

Note: While claim rates can serve as an indicator of a company’s safety performance, they’re not a conclusive measure.

Exclusions

In Alberta, about 85% of the total provincial workforce is employed by an employer with a workers’ compensation account (or “is covered by the WCB”). This includes workers in compulsory industries that must be covered, as well as employers operating in industries where WCB coverage is voluntary.

In certain industries, however, employers have the option of covering their workers through WCB, using other insurance carriers, or not insuring their workers. Data for employers in these voluntary industries have been excluded from this report.

If you have any concern regarding the information contained in this database, contact the OHS Contact Centre.

Show Answer Terms of use

While there’s good comparability of the 5-year snapshot of employer injury claims and rate statistics released by Alberta Labour with those released directly by WCB, small methodological and coverage differences exist due to differing business reporting requirements. For these reasons, statistics released by the ministry and by the WCB are not expected to be identical. Consideration of when the data were last updated should also be noted by the users of this report.

WCB issues accounts to employers based on the structure of their corporations. In most cases employers operate with a single account and one assigned industry. However in other cases, particularly those of more complex organizations, employers may have more than one account in more than one industry or multiple industries on one account. As well, an employer may be reassigned to a new industry based on changes in their operations or based on changes in WCB’s industry descriptions. Care should be taken in considering which operation is being referenced in the report.

Claims may be registered by an employer, an injured worker or a health care provider within two years of the incident occurring. WCB regularly audits employers to ensure they comply with reporting claims properly.

The lost-time claims (LTC) and disabling injury claims (DI) published in this report include those accepted by WCB as of March 31, 2014. Rates and Certificate of Recognition (COR) information are calculated using methodology that’s applied consistently across all employer records. Employer rates are compared to their industry rate and the provincial rate as an indicator of their safety performance, relative to their industry and/or the provincial safety performance.

Show Answer Definitions

Terms and definitions used in database records are as follows:

Lost-Time Claim (LTC) – A claim that was accepted in the calendar year for an occupational injury or disease that causes the worker to have time away from work beyond the day of the injury. Included are claims receiving reimbursement of full or partial lost wages due to occupational illness or injury, or payment for permanent loss of function.

Disabling Injury Claim (DI) – A claim that combines both the lost-time and modified-work concepts to produce an overall figure where an occupational injury or disease disables the worker causing either time-lost from work or for their normal work duties to be modified. The DI figures in this report are not expected to reconcile with the DI figures/numbers published in the OHS index and WCB data as it covers a broader range of injuries, including those that are less severe in nature with no claim costs.

Person-years estimate – Estimates of full-time workers calculated from wage and payroll data provided to WCB by account holders. Person-years worked are estimates provided by the WCB. One person-year is equivalent to one full-time worker working for one year, and can be assumed to equal 2,000 hours worked.

Certificate of Recognition (COR) – A Certificate of Recognition (COR) is awarded to employers who develop health and safety management systems that meet established standards. For certification, an employer must successfully pass an external audit conducted by a certified auditor, scoring at least 80% overall with no less than 50% in each of the audit element. CORs are issued by Alberta Labour and are co-signed by the employer’s Certifying Partner.

The COR is issued effective the last day of audit on-site activities. Typically, CORs are issued for a three-year period and the expiry date is indicated on the COR. To maintain a valid COR, employers must conduct maintenance audits in each of the next two calendar years. Failure to conduct a maintenance audit will result in the cancellation of an employer’s COR.

For recertification, employers must pass a new external audit conducted by a certified auditor. To maintain continuous certification, the new external audit must be completed prior to the expiry date of the original COR.

Fatality – An occupational fatality is the death of a worker resulting from an incident or exposure which has been accepted by the WCB for compensation. Occupational fatalities include work-related motor vehicle and workplace incidents and occupational diseases. If the death happens on the day of incident there will be no lost-time claim. Some of the fatalities accepted in a particular year arise from incidents or exposures occurring in prior years, such as is the case in many occupational disease cases.

Show Answer Parameters and measures

Time Frame

Each report is based on a 5-year snapshot of workplace incidents that occurred between 2010 and 2014 and were accepted as claims by the Workers’ Compensation Board-Alberta (WCB) as of March 31, 2015. The report also includes occupational fatalities that occurred between 2010 and 2014 as reported by March 31, 2015.

Parameters

Reports focus on employer performance in the compulsory industries in Alberta covered by WCB and by the provincial legislation for occupational health and safety. A 5-year snapshot of employers’ claims histories is included in the report.

Measures

The lost-time claim rate is the number of lost-time claims per 100 person-years worked. Injury claim rates based on a small number of person-years worked are too volatile to make valid comparisons over time. Therefore, claim rates are not calculated in instances where there are fewer than 40 person-years worked.

The disabling injury rate is calculated by dividing the number of disabling injury claims by the person-years worked estimates, and multiplying the result by 100. The disabling injury rate represents the probability or risk of a disabling injury or disease to a worker during a period of one-year of work. The disabling injury rate is similar to the lost-time claim rate although it covers a broader range of injuries, including those that are less severe in nature (do not require time away from work). The rate represents the number of claims per 100 person-years worked and includes claims made for both lost-time and modified work.

Industry codes are based on WCB industry classifications and aggregation. This report excludes the industries deemed “voluntary” under WCB legislation. For more information, see the WCB Rate and Industry Description Manual.

The person-years estimate is equivalent to one full-time worker working for one year, and can be assumed to equal 2,000 hours worked. The person-years estimate is not an actual count of the workers at the employer’s operations.

Each report provides a 5-year snapshot at the employer level for the history of lost-time claims and occupational fatalities. Many of the occupational disease claims are assigned to an industry rather than to a specific employer.

Show Answer Formulas for calculating rates

Lost-Time Claim (LTC) Rate

The LTC rate is calculated by dividing the number of lost-time claims by the person-years worked estimate, and multiplying the result by 100. The LTC rate represents the probability or risk of an injury or disease to a worker during a period of one year of work, which will result in time lost from work. Comparisons of LTC rates between industries or between years can be used to indicate changes to this risk.

Number of LTC’s

LTC Rate =___________________x 100 Person-Years worked

Disabling Injury (DI) Rate

The DI rate is calculated by dividing the number of disabling injury claims by the person-years worked estimates, and multiplying the result by 100. The DI rate represents the probability or risk of a disabling injury or disease to a worker during a period of one-year of work. The DI rate represents the number of claims per 100 person-years worked and includes claims made for both lost-time and modified work.

Number of DI’s

DI Rate =___________________x 100 Person-Years worked

Show Answer Data definitions

Field Data Elements Displayed in this Report

Employer Name Name of company, sorted alphabetically within industry.
Common Business Name Operating name or the commonly known name of the business when it is available. This name may or may not be the same as the employer name.
City The city of the employer’s mailing address as provided to the WCB. Although the address may be outside Alberta, this report includes only Alberta worksite claims and person-years.
Account Number An identifier to distinguish an employer’s WCB account or multiple WCB accounts.
Year Occurrence year of the claim and person-years associated with that operating (calendar) year. The report will collect and display the past five operational years.
Certificate of Recognition (COR) Indicates if an employer had a COR anytime during the reported calendar year.
# Lost-Time Claims Total number of accepted lost-time claims, based on definitions elsewhere in this document, as reported by March 31, 2015.
Person-Years Estimate One person-year can be assumed to be 2,000 hours worked per year.
Lost-Time Claim (LTC) Rate / per 100 PY The number of lost-time claims per 100 person-years. LTC Rate is not calculated if the employer has less than 40 person- years, so this field would be blank.
Disabling Injury (DI) Rate The number of claims per 100 person-years worked. This includes claims made for both lost-time and modified work.
Motor Vehicle Fatalities The number of motor vehicle fatalities accepted in that calendar year.
Workplace Incident Fatalities The number of workplace incident fatalities accepted in that calendar year.
Occupational Disease Fatalities The number of occupational disease fatalities accepted in that calendar year.
[Year] Industry Total Statistics for the industry in the most recent year reported.
[Year] Provincial Total Provincial statistics for the most recent year report.

Show Answer Disclaimer

The reports in this database contain employer-specific data on lost-time claims and disabling injury claims and fatalities as reported to the Workers’ Compensation Board–Alberta (WCB). The data presented in the reports include employers who are required to have WCB accounts. Alberta Labour calculates and provides lost-time and disabling injury claim rates upon the formulas listed.

The information provided in the reports is solely for the user’s information and convenience and, while thought to be accurate and functional, it’s provided without warranty of any kind. It’s the responsibility of the user to scrutinize, analyze, interpret, and apply the information properly for any intended purpose.

The user is further advised to review the Terms of use for further information on the proper use of the reports. The Crown, its agents, employees or contractors will not be liable to the user for any damages, direct or indirect, arising out of use of the information contained in the reports.

Alberta Labour strives to ensure the information contained within the reports is accurate. Each report provides a 5-year snapshot at the employer level. All data in these reports are drawn from information reported to the WCB by March 31, 2015.

If you have any concern regarding the information contained within the reports, contact the OHS Contact Centre.

Show Answer Privacy

The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIP) provides a right of access to records held by public bodies. At the same time, it protects the personal privacy of Albertans by controlling the manner in which a public body manages their personal information.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act in Section 28.1 states:

“The Minister may, in order to enhance the protection of workers and the prevention of work site injuries by encouraging good and discouraging bad work site safety records,

  1. establish indices and measurements of work site injury prevention,
  2. maintain a register consisting of the names of employers and their performance, as determined by the Minister, in relation to those indices and measurements,
  3. publish, or authorize a department or agency of the Government or any other entity to publish, the information contained in that register, and
  4. collect any information needed for that register from another public body that provides the information to the Minister.”

Alberta Labour applies confidentiality rules to all data that are released or published, to prevent the publication or disclosure of any information deemed confidential. For more information, please refer to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, and to Alberta Labour’s privacy commitment.

Created:
Modified: 2016-09-23
PID: 15349

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