OHS Code Explanation Guide

Published Date: July 01, 2009
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Part 36 Mining

Section 597 Diesel powered machine

Subsection 597(1)

CSA Standard CAN/CSA-M424.1-88 (R2007), Flameproof Non-Rail-Bound, Diesel-Powered Machines for Use in Gassy Underground Coal Mines, describes the technical requirements and procedures necessary for the design, performance and testing of new or unused flameproof, non-rail-bound diesel-powered, self-propelled machines for use in gassy underground mines. The working environment of such mines is characterized by the presence of methane gas and combustible dust.

The Standard applies to all machines of 45,000 kilograms (100,000 pounds) mass or less, which are designed to operate on level ground at a maximum speed of 32 kilometres per hour (20 miles per hour) or less.

Subsection 597(2)

This Standard describes the technical requirements and procedures necessary for the design, performance and testing of new or unused flameproof, non-rail-bound diesel-powered, self-propelled machines for use in non-gassy underground mines.

The Standard applies to all machines of 45,000 kilograms (100,000 pounds) mass or less, which are designed to operate on level ground at a maximum speed of 32 kilometres per hour (20 miles per hour) or less on level ground.

The very limited size of Canada’s underground coal mining industry is such that certifications and services previously available within Canada may no longer be provided. In such a case, the Director may approve equipment using the standard of another country. Compliance with this standard would still have to show that the equipment meets or exceeds the safety requirements of Alberta’s OHS Code.

For example, the need to source mining equipment from outside of Canada, often from the US, is an increasingly common experience. An example would be diesel engines for rubber tired mobile equipment for use underground. Such equipment may not be certified to a Canadian standard but meets a standard of the source country. However, the two standards may differ to varying degrees. In such a case the employer must demonstrate how the equipment meets or exceeds the safety requirements of Alberta’s OHS Code.